• Measuring miles on a nautical chart

    How to measure distance on a nautical chart.

    published: 26 Jan 2016
  • Measuring distance on a nautical chart

    How to measure distance on a chart and work out the time it will take to travel. Nautical navigation. Watersports training

    published: 27 May 2009
  • Nautical Miles & Knots

    via YouTube Capture

    published: 04 Jul 2013
  • Finding Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

    Yera 11 Math A Navigation Video

    published: 17 Sep 2017
  • Sailing lesson - The Nautical Slide Rule

    This video shows how to use the nautical slide rule. Given two of the variables of speed and distance, the slide rule will calculate the other.

    published: 16 Mar 2009
  • The 3 Minute and 6 Minute Rules

    The 3 and 6 minute rules are handy for quickly determining how far your ship will travel in a given amount of time. 3 minute rule: Your ship's speed (knots) x 100 = Distance travelled (yards) in 3 minutes. 6 minute rule: Your ship's speed (knots) / 10 = Distance travelled (miles) in 6 minutes. You can also deduce other rules: the 15 minute rule, the 12 minute rule, etc.

    published: 12 Jan 2014
  • Calculating Distance with Latitude

    In this tutorial, Jennifer shows how you can use a location's latitude to determine how far north or south it is from another location. The same process can be used to calculate how far east or west a location is from another using longitude. One important reminder that is shown is how many minutes of latitude are in one degree of longitude.

    published: 14 Oct 2015
  • Marking Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

    Navigation Course Math A

    published: 17 Sep 2017
  • 5" Nautical shell Lidu distance test

    5", water, shell, nautical, test, distance, fireworks, cool.

    published: 09 May 2015
  • Nautical mile - Video Learning - WizScience.com

    A "nautical mile" is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly . It is a non-SI unit used especially by navigators at sea and in the air, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the "sea mile" and the related geographical mile. The nautical mile remains in use by sea and air navigators worldwide because of its convenience when working with charts. Most nautical charts use the Mercator projection whose scale varies by about a factor of six from the equator to 80° latitude, so charts covering large areas cannot use a single linear scale. The nautical ...

    published: 10 Sep 2015
  • Navigation - nautical distances (1of2)

    Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar

    published: 02 Sep 2011
  • Nautical mile

    The nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly (about 6,076 feet). It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Units by the BIPM) used especially by navigators in the shipping and aviation industries, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

    published: 01 Aug 2014
  • What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning & explanation

    What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning - NAUTICAL MILE definition -NAUTICAL MILE length - NAUTICAL MILE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance, set by international agreement as being exactly 1852 meters (about 6,076 feet), compared with the 5,280 feet in a statute mile. Historically, it was defined as the distance spanned by one minute of arc along a meridian of the Earth (north-south), and developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. Graphic scale from a Mercator projection world map, showing the change with latitude It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Unit...

    published: 09 Aug 2016
  • The Nautical mile

    Simple, easy to understand math videos aimed at High School students.

    published: 01 Nov 2015
  • Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends

    Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends a central angle of 1 minute . This distance is called a nautical mile. (The radius of the earth is 3960 mi.)

    published: 04 Apr 2014
  • Great Circle Distance

    Calculate the distance between two cities.

    published: 20 Apr 2013
  • 1.4.2- Fuel Consumption- Distance, Speed &Time Calculations

    published: 22 Sep 2014
  • TRIG V3.4 (nautical miles and knots)

    John Short explains how to find distances on the Earth's surface in nautical miles and how to calculate speeds in knots. Example from John Short's Compendium of General Maths: Trigonometry

    published: 06 Jul 2015
  • 300 nautical miles part 1

    This flight is part of Canadian Commercial Pilot Training. You have to fligh a minimal distance of approx 300 nautical miles (approx. 600km) and land at 2 airports on your way. We where 2 pilots in this flight. One of us would fly one way and the other one the way back. So this is what it looks like being pilot, that's what we do... we fly.

    published: 04 Jun 2007
  • How to measure distance on a chart

    This short 'how to' film by Stormforce Coaching's Principal, Doug Innes, demonstrates how to measure the distance between two points on a chart, using latitude. Doug explains how to use a latitude scale and a set of dividers to measure a distance, and how to equate minutes and miles.

    published: 27 Sep 2012
  • 34 fix position distances and compass bearings distances and compass bearings 1

    You can obtain a fix by combining two or more distances or distances and compass bearings. This is how you plot a fix position combining two or more distances: Let's assume you sail near the coast. The radar is in good working condition and in operation. Taking into account your last position, and after comparing the nautical chart's coast line with that on the radar screen, you spot two points on the screen, A and B, from where you can take distances. The equivalent ones on the nautical chart are points A and B. Using the radar's range marker you measure a distance of 5.2 nautical miles from point A, and 2.8 nautical miles from point B. You note the time - let's assume it is 0930 hours. Then return to the nautical chart, and using the dividers, span a distance of 5.2 nautical mil...

    published: 11 Apr 2014
  • Navigation - nautical distances (2of2)

    Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar

    published: 02 Sep 2011
  • 19 dead reckoning

    When we are on an open sea passage out of sight of land, at night or in a dense fog, we must be able to keep an accurate track of our position and course at all times. There are many ways we can do this, and many techniques we can use for finding our position. The most basic technique is called the Dead-Reckoning Technique. Let's assume that we are sailing from A to B, and that A is the last fixed position plotted on the chart at 10:00. Now it is 11:30 and we have to plot a new position using the Dead Reckoning (DR). The true course is 045 degrees, and the speed through the water, taken from the speed log is 7 knots Knowing the course, the speed, and the running time from 10:00 am to 11:30 am, we can find the distance sailed using the formula - D is equal to S times T divided by 60, w...

    published: 11 Apr 2014
  • 300 nautical miles part 2

    This flight is part of Canadian Commercial Pilot Training. You have to fligh a minimal distance of approx 300 nautical miles (approx. 600km) and land at 2 airports on your way. We where 2 pilots in this flight. One of us would fly one way and the other one the way back. So this is what it looks like being pilot, that's what we do... we fly.

    published: 04 Jun 2007
developed with YouTube
Measuring miles on a nautical chart

Measuring miles on a nautical chart

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:35
  • Updated: 26 Jan 2016
  • views: 4533
videos
How to measure distance on a nautical chart.
https://wn.com/Measuring_Miles_On_A_Nautical_Chart
Measuring distance on a nautical chart

Measuring distance on a nautical chart

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:43
  • Updated: 27 May 2009
  • views: 18057
videos
How to measure distance on a chart and work out the time it will take to travel. Nautical navigation. Watersports training
https://wn.com/Measuring_Distance_On_A_Nautical_Chart
Nautical Miles & Knots

Nautical Miles & Knots

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:53
  • Updated: 04 Jul 2013
  • views: 15659
videos
via YouTube Capture
https://wn.com/Nautical_Miles_Knots
Finding Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

Finding Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:10
  • Updated: 17 Sep 2017
  • views: 55
videos https://wn.com/Finding_Distance_(Nautical_Map_Navigation)
Sailing lesson - The Nautical Slide Rule

Sailing lesson - The Nautical Slide Rule

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:39
  • Updated: 16 Mar 2009
  • views: 16173
videos
This video shows how to use the nautical slide rule. Given two of the variables of speed and distance, the slide rule will calculate the other.
https://wn.com/Sailing_Lesson_The_Nautical_Slide_Rule
The 3 Minute and 6 Minute Rules

The 3 Minute and 6 Minute Rules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12
  • Updated: 12 Jan 2014
  • views: 8285
videos
The 3 and 6 minute rules are handy for quickly determining how far your ship will travel in a given amount of time. 3 minute rule: Your ship's speed (knots) x 100 = Distance travelled (yards) in 3 minutes. 6 minute rule: Your ship's speed (knots) / 10 = Distance travelled (miles) in 6 minutes. You can also deduce other rules: the 15 minute rule, the 12 minute rule, etc.
https://wn.com/The_3_Minute_And_6_Minute_Rules
Calculating Distance with Latitude

Calculating Distance with Latitude

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:01
  • Updated: 14 Oct 2015
  • views: 45719
videos
In this tutorial, Jennifer shows how you can use a location's latitude to determine how far north or south it is from another location. The same process can be used to calculate how far east or west a location is from another using longitude. One important reminder that is shown is how many minutes of latitude are in one degree of longitude.
https://wn.com/Calculating_Distance_With_Latitude
Marking Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

Marking Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:40
  • Updated: 17 Sep 2017
  • views: 28
videos https://wn.com/Marking_Distance_(Nautical_Map_Navigation)
5" Nautical shell Lidu distance test

5" Nautical shell Lidu distance test

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:29
  • Updated: 09 May 2015
  • views: 146
videos
5", water, shell, nautical, test, distance, fireworks, cool.
https://wn.com/5_Nautical_Shell_Lidu_Distance_Test
Nautical mile - Video Learning - WizScience.com

Nautical mile - Video Learning - WizScience.com

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:47
  • Updated: 10 Sep 2015
  • views: 2266
videos
A "nautical mile" is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly . It is a non-SI unit used especially by navigators at sea and in the air, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the "sea mile" and the related geographical mile. The nautical mile remains in use by sea and air navigators worldwide because of its convenience when working with charts. Most nautical charts use the Mercator projection whose scale varies by about a factor of six from the equator to 80° latitude, so charts covering large areas cannot use a single linear scale. The nautical mile is nearly equal to a minute of latitude on a chart, so a distance measured with a chart divider can be roughly converted to nautical miles using the chart's latitude scale. The "international nautical mile" was defined by the First International Extraordinary Hydrographic Conference, Monaco as exactly 1,852 metres. This is the only definition in widespread current use, and is the one accepted by the International Hydrographic Organization and by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures . Before 1929 different countries had different definitions, and the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and the United States did not immediately accept the international value. The Imperial and U.S. definitions of the nautical mile were based on the Clarke Spheroid: they were different approximations to the length of one minute of arc along a great circle of a sphere having the same surface area as the Clarke Spheroid. The United States nautical mile was defined as 1,853.248 metres : it was abandoned in favour of the international nautical mile in 1954. The Imperial nautical mile, also known as the "Admiralty mile", was defined in terms of the knot, such that one nautical mile was exactly 6,080 international feet : it was abandoned in 1970 and, for legal purposes, old references to the obsolete unit are now converted to 1,853 metres exactly. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautical+mile, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautical+mile, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
https://wn.com/Nautical_Mile_Video_Learning_Wizscience.Com
Navigation  - nautical distances (1of2)

Navigation - nautical distances (1of2)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:44
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2011
  • views: 509
videos
Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar
https://wn.com/Navigation_Nautical_Distances_(1Of2)
Nautical mile

Nautical mile

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:57
  • Updated: 01 Aug 2014
  • views: 6750
videos
The nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly (about 6,076 feet). It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Units by the BIPM) used especially by navigators in the shipping and aviation industries, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
https://wn.com/Nautical_Mile
What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning & explanation

What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning & explanation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:49
  • Updated: 09 Aug 2016
  • views: 5484
videos
What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning - NAUTICAL MILE definition -NAUTICAL MILE length - NAUTICAL MILE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance, set by international agreement as being exactly 1852 meters (about 6,076 feet), compared with the 5,280 feet in a statute mile. Historically, it was defined as the distance spanned by one minute of arc along a meridian of the Earth (north-south), and developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. Graphic scale from a Mercator projection world map, showing the change with latitude It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Units by the BIPM), which is generally used by navigators at sea and in the air, and also in polar exploration. It remains in use worldwide because of its convenience when working with charts. Most nautical charts use the Mercator projection, whose scale varies by about a factor of 6 from the equator to 80° latitude, so charts covering large areas cannot use a single linear scale. The nautical mile is nearly equal to a minute of latitude on a chart, so a distance measured with a chart divider can be roughly converted to nautical miles using the chart's latitude scale. The nautical mile is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Nautical_Mile_What_Does_Nautical_Mile_Mean_Nautical_Mile_Meaning_Explanation
The Nautical mile

The Nautical mile

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:42
  • Updated: 01 Nov 2015
  • views: 5617
videos
Simple, easy to understand math videos aimed at High School students.
https://wn.com/The_Nautical_Mile
Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends

Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:10
  • Updated: 04 Apr 2014
  • views: 775
videos
Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends a central angle of 1 minute . This distance is called a nautical mile. (The radius of the earth is 3960 mi.)
https://wn.com/Nautical_Miles_Find_The_Distance_Along_An_Arc_On_The_Surface_Of_The_Earth_That_Subtends
Great Circle Distance

Great Circle Distance

  • Order:
  • Duration: 13:37
  • Updated: 20 Apr 2013
  • views: 47359
videos
Calculate the distance between two cities.
https://wn.com/Great_Circle_Distance
1.4.2- Fuel Consumption- Distance, Speed &Time Calculations

1.4.2- Fuel Consumption- Distance, Speed &Time Calculations

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:57
  • Updated: 22 Sep 2014
  • views: 19360
videos
https://wn.com/1.4.2_Fuel_Consumption_Distance,_Speed_Time_Calculations
TRIG V3.4 (nautical miles and knots)

TRIG V3.4 (nautical miles and knots)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:44
  • Updated: 06 Jul 2015
  • views: 1220
videos
John Short explains how to find distances on the Earth's surface in nautical miles and how to calculate speeds in knots. Example from John Short's Compendium of General Maths: Trigonometry
https://wn.com/Trig_V3.4_(Nautical_Miles_And_Knots)
300 nautical miles part 1

300 nautical miles part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:54
  • Updated: 04 Jun 2007
  • views: 423
videos
This flight is part of Canadian Commercial Pilot Training. You have to fligh a minimal distance of approx 300 nautical miles (approx. 600km) and land at 2 airports on your way. We where 2 pilots in this flight. One of us would fly one way and the other one the way back. So this is what it looks like being pilot, that's what we do... we fly.
https://wn.com/300_Nautical_Miles_Part_1
How to measure distance on a chart

How to measure distance on a chart

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:37
  • Updated: 27 Sep 2012
  • views: 3874
videos
This short 'how to' film by Stormforce Coaching's Principal, Doug Innes, demonstrates how to measure the distance between two points on a chart, using latitude. Doug explains how to use a latitude scale and a set of dividers to measure a distance, and how to equate minutes and miles.
https://wn.com/How_To_Measure_Distance_On_A_Chart
34   fix position distances and compass bearings distances and compass bearings 1

34 fix position distances and compass bearings distances and compass bearings 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:48
  • Updated: 11 Apr 2014
  • views: 10998
videos
You can obtain a fix by combining two or more distances or distances and compass bearings. This is how you plot a fix position combining two or more distances: Let's assume you sail near the coast. The radar is in good working condition and in operation. Taking into account your last position, and after comparing the nautical chart's coast line with that on the radar screen, you spot two points on the screen, A and B, from where you can take distances. The equivalent ones on the nautical chart are points A and B. Using the radar's range marker you measure a distance of 5.2 nautical miles from point A, and 2.8 nautical miles from point B. You note the time - let's assume it is 0930 hours. Then return to the nautical chart, and using the dividers, span a distance of 5.2 nautical miles on the latitude scale which is closest to the present position and which runs along the sides of the chart. Apply this span, placing one leg of the dividers at point A, and draw a semicircle near the course line. Now span a distance of 2.8 nautical miles and apply this span, placing one leg of the dividers at point B, and draw a second semicircle intersecting the first semicircle and near the course line. The point where the two semicircles intersect is the fix position at 0930 hours.
https://wn.com/34_Fix_Position_Distances_And_Compass_Bearings_Distances_And_Compass_Bearings_1
Navigation - nautical distances (2of2)

Navigation - nautical distances (2of2)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:51
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2011
  • views: 256
videos
Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar
https://wn.com/Navigation_Nautical_Distances_(2Of2)
19   dead reckoning

19 dead reckoning

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:04
  • Updated: 11 Apr 2014
  • views: 5604
videos
When we are on an open sea passage out of sight of land, at night or in a dense fog, we must be able to keep an accurate track of our position and course at all times. There are many ways we can do this, and many techniques we can use for finding our position. The most basic technique is called the Dead-Reckoning Technique. Let's assume that we are sailing from A to B, and that A is the last fixed position plotted on the chart at 10:00. Now it is 11:30 and we have to plot a new position using the Dead Reckoning (DR). The true course is 045 degrees, and the speed through the water, taken from the speed log is 7 knots Knowing the course, the speed, and the running time from 10:00 am to 11:30 am, we can find the distance sailed using the formula - D is equal to S times T divided by 60, where D is the distance in nautical miles, S is the boat speed, and T is the time in minutes. In our case: 7 knots times 90 minutes divided by 60 equals 10.5 nautical miles. Using the dividers, we span a distance of 10.5 miles on the latitude scale which is closest to the course line, and which runs along the sides of the chart. We applied this span on our course, placing one leg of the dividers on the 10:00 position and the other leg on the course, marking the new position with an X, recording the time of 11:30am.
https://wn.com/19_Dead_Reckoning
300 nautical miles part 2

300 nautical miles part 2

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:37
  • Updated: 04 Jun 2007
  • views: 617
videos
This flight is part of Canadian Commercial Pilot Training. You have to fligh a minimal distance of approx 300 nautical miles (approx. 600km) and land at 2 airports on your way. We where 2 pilots in this flight. One of us would fly one way and the other one the way back. So this is what it looks like being pilot, that's what we do... we fly.
https://wn.com/300_Nautical_Miles_Part_2
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