• Measuring miles on a nautical chart

    How to measure distance on a nautical chart.

    published: 26 Jan 2016
  • Measuring distance on a nautical chart

    How to measure distance on a chart and work out the time it will take to travel. Nautical navigation. Watersports training

    published: 27 May 2009
  • Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends

    Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends a central angle of 1 minute . This distance is called a nautical mile. (The radius of the earth is 3960 mi.)

    published: 04 Apr 2014
  • Nautical Miles & Knots

    via YouTube Capture

    published: 04 Jul 2013
  • What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning & explanation

    What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning - NAUTICAL MILE definition -NAUTICAL MILE length - NAUTICAL MILE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance, set by international agreement as being exactly 1852 meters (about 6,076 feet), compared with the 5,280 feet in a statute mile. Historically, it was defined as the distance spanned by one minute of arc along a meridian of the Earth (north-south), and developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. Graphic scale from a Mercator projection world map, showing the change with latitude It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Unit...

    published: 09 Aug 2016
  • Nautical mile

    The nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly (about 6,076 feet). It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Units by the BIPM) used especially by navigators in the shipping and aviation industries, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

    published: 01 Aug 2014
  • Navigation - nautical distances (1of2)

    Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar

    published: 02 Sep 2011
  • Determining Position by Celestial Navigation 1971 US Navy Training Film; Graphic Films Cart

    Nautical Navigation playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4670A28FC2CC02EF Pilot Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA6387BA013F9A4D US Navy Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA40407C12E5E35A7 more at http://quickfound.net "There are three steps to establish a celestial line of position: observation, computation, and plotting..." Training film for US Navy fliers. US Navy Training Film MN-10780D, cartoon produced by Graphic Films. Originally a public domain film from the US Navy, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, ...

    published: 04 Sep 2017
  • The Nautical mile

    Simple, easy to understand math videos aimed at High School students.

    published: 01 Nov 2015
  • Sailing lesson - The Nautical Slide Rule

    This video shows how to use the nautical slide rule. Given two of the variables of speed and distance, the slide rule will calculate the other.

    published: 16 Mar 2009
  • Great Circle Distance

    Calculate the distance between two cities.

    published: 20 Apr 2013
  • Calculating Distance with Latitude

    In this tutorial, Jennifer shows how you can use a location's latitude to determine how far north or south it is from another location. The same process can be used to calculate how far east or west a location is from another using longitude. One important reminder that is shown is how many minutes of latitude are in one degree of longitude.

    published: 14 Oct 2015
  • Navigation Basics - Reading a Nautical Chart - Kayaking Tips #48 - Kayak Hipster

    Some basics of navigation, I go through the following topics on how to read a nautical chart: - Depths - Buoys, RRR - Hazards - Latitude and Longitude - Distances - Compass Rose - Magnetic vs True North Kayak Hipster http://www.kayakhipster.com

    published: 16 Nov 2016
  • Qgis Make circle by centre point and distance in degrees or nautical miles

    make circle by centre point Latitude and Longitude and distance in degress and nautical miles

    published: 26 Jan 2017
  • Viewing Nautical Charts on Google Earth

    A slick way to do echart navigation on google earth, as well as viewing all NOAA charts and even a fast way to download the RNC versions. NOTE: WE UPDATED THE LINK BELOW JAN 16, 2018 (thanks to PorcineJim ) Main link at NOAA describing the process https://nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/data/gis-data-and-services.html#seamless-raster-nautical-chart-services Direct link to the Google Earth file we need https://seamlessrnc.nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/rnc/noaa_rncs.kmz

    published: 15 Dec 2015
  • Traditional Nautical Chart Navigation - Course P.S.C.

    Learn how to plot a course per standard compass on a paper nautical chart from the experts at U.S. Captains Training. Captain Neil Smith demonstrates finding points using the longitude and latitude scales, taking proper measurement on the compass rose with parallel rules, and converting degrees True to Compass. Practice along on a 1983 Block Island Sound chart to prepare for your upcoming U.S. Captains Training class and test.

    published: 26 Jan 2010
  • E6B Flight Computer: Kilometers to Statue or Nautical Miles

    In this tutorial, I will demonstrate how to distance between Kilometers and Statute or Nautical miles using the Jeppesen E6B mechanical flight computer. If you find any mistakes, please point them out. Feel free to leave questions, comments, and feedback below. Good luck on your journey to becoming a pilot!

    published: 08 Dec 2010
  • Finding Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

    Yera 11 Math A Navigation Video

    published: 17 Sep 2017
  • Marking Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

    Navigation Course Math A

    published: 17 Sep 2017
  • Navigation - nautical distances (2of2)

    Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar

    published: 02 Sep 2011
  • Distance SOLVED on GLEASON MAP • SCL to SYD • LAW OF COSINES • Flat Earth • Math & other fun stuff!

    Flat Earth • 2017 • Chippy The Chipmunk had a "HOLY SH*T" moment when he realized straight line distances can be calculated between two places on Gleason's Flat Earth Map by using the Law of Cosines math. However, in this video, Chippy is making the assumption that each 15° of longitude = 900 Nautical Miles (as claimed by the globe folks). If Gleason is correct, then the circumference around the world is about 49,714 regular miles; which would mean that the diameter all the way across is 15,824 regular miles. This means that when you divide 15,824 miles by 24 (15° segments) = 659.33 regular miles, or 659.33/15 = 49.96 regular miles per 1° of longitude. In other words, we'd have to re-calculate using 659.33 miles per every 15° of longitude instead of using the globe's 900NM (1,035 miles...

    published: 08 Apr 2017
  • 5" Nautical shell Lidu distance test

    5", water, shell, nautical, test, distance, fireworks, cool.

    published: 09 May 2015
  • Chart Navigation (Chart Plotting Part 1)

    The steps for using a chart to fix your position, determine the dead reckoning, finding set and drift, course made good, and speed made good.

    published: 07 Nov 2014
  • Nautical mile - Video Learning - WizScience.com

    A "nautical mile" is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly . It is a non-SI unit used especially by navigators at sea and in the air, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the "sea mile" and the related geographical mile. The nautical mile remains in use by sea and air navigators worldwide because of its convenience when working with charts. Most nautical charts use the Mercator projection whose scale varies by about a factor of six from the equator to 80° latitude, so charts covering large areas cannot use a single linear scale. The nautical ...

    published: 10 Sep 2015
developed with YouTube
Measuring miles on a nautical chart

Measuring miles on a nautical chart

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:35
  • Updated: 26 Jan 2016
  • views: 5353
videos
How to measure distance on a nautical chart.
https://wn.com/Measuring_Miles_On_A_Nautical_Chart
Measuring distance on a nautical chart

Measuring distance on a nautical chart

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:43
  • Updated: 27 May 2009
  • views: 18372
videos
How to measure distance on a chart and work out the time it will take to travel. Nautical navigation. Watersports training
https://wn.com/Measuring_Distance_On_A_Nautical_Chart
Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends

Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:10
  • Updated: 04 Apr 2014
  • views: 823
videos
Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends a central angle of 1 minute . This distance is called a nautical mile. (The radius of the earth is 3960 mi.)
https://wn.com/Nautical_Miles_Find_The_Distance_Along_An_Arc_On_The_Surface_Of_The_Earth_That_Subtends
Nautical Miles & Knots

Nautical Miles & Knots

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:53
  • Updated: 04 Jul 2013
  • views: 17281
videos
via YouTube Capture
https://wn.com/Nautical_Miles_Knots
What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning & explanation

What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning & explanation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:49
  • Updated: 09 Aug 2016
  • views: 8894
videos
What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning - NAUTICAL MILE definition -NAUTICAL MILE length - NAUTICAL MILE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance, set by international agreement as being exactly 1852 meters (about 6,076 feet), compared with the 5,280 feet in a statute mile. Historically, it was defined as the distance spanned by one minute of arc along a meridian of the Earth (north-south), and developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. Graphic scale from a Mercator projection world map, showing the change with latitude It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Units by the BIPM), which is generally used by navigators at sea and in the air, and also in polar exploration. It remains in use worldwide because of its convenience when working with charts. Most nautical charts use the Mercator projection, whose scale varies by about a factor of 6 from the equator to 80° latitude, so charts covering large areas cannot use a single linear scale. The nautical mile is nearly equal to a minute of latitude on a chart, so a distance measured with a chart divider can be roughly converted to nautical miles using the chart's latitude scale. The nautical mile is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Nautical_Mile_What_Does_Nautical_Mile_Mean_Nautical_Mile_Meaning_Explanation
Nautical mile

Nautical mile

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:57
  • Updated: 01 Aug 2014
  • views: 7879
videos
The nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly (about 6,076 feet). It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Units by the BIPM) used especially by navigators in the shipping and aviation industries, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
https://wn.com/Nautical_Mile
Navigation  - nautical distances (1of2)

Navigation - nautical distances (1of2)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:44
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2011
  • views: 510
videos
Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar
https://wn.com/Navigation_Nautical_Distances_(1Of2)
Determining Position by Celestial Navigation 1971 US Navy Training Film; Graphic Films Cart

Determining Position by Celestial Navigation 1971 US Navy Training Film; Graphic Films Cart

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:36
  • Updated: 04 Sep 2017
  • views: 7444
videos
Nautical Navigation playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4670A28FC2CC02EF Pilot Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA6387BA013F9A4D US Navy Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA40407C12E5E35A7 more at http://quickfound.net "There are three steps to establish a celestial line of position: observation, computation, and plotting..." Training film for US Navy fliers. US Navy Training Film MN-10780D, cartoon produced by Graphic Films. Originally a public domain film from the US Navy, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celestial_navigation Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Celestial navigation, also known as astronavigation, is the ancient science of position fixing that enables a navigator to transition through a space without having to rely on estimated calculations, or dead reckoning, to know their position. Celestial navigation uses "sights," or angular measurements taken between a celestial body (the sun, the moon, a planet or a star) and the visible horizon. The sun is most commonly used, but navigators can also use the moon, a planet, Polaris, or one of 57 other navigational stars whose coordinates are tabulated in the nautical almanac and air almanacs. Celestial navigation is the use of angular measurements (sights) between celestial bodies and the visible horizon to locate one's position on the globe, on land as well as at sea. At a given time, any celestial body is located directly over one point on the Earth's surface. The latitude and longitude of that point is known as the celestial body’s geographic position (GP), the location of which can be determined from tables in the Nautical or Air Almanac for that year. The measured angle between the celestial body and the visible horizon is directly related to the distance between the celestial body's GP and the observer's position. After some computations, referred to as sight reduction, this measurement is used to plot a line of position (LOP) on a navigational chart or plotting work sheet, the observer's position being somewhere on that line. (The LOP is actually a short segment of a very large circle on the earth which surrounds the GP of the observed celestial body. An observer located anywhere on the circumference of this circle on the earth, measuring the angle of the same celestial body above the horizon at that instant of time, would observe that body to be at the same angle above the horizon.) Sights on two celestial bodies give two such lines on the chart, intersecting at the observer's position (actually, the two circles would result in two points of intersection arising from sights on two stars described above, but one can be discarded since it will be far from the estimated position—see the figure at example below). Most navigators will use sights of three to five stars, if they're available, since that will result in only one common intersection and minimize the chance for error. That premise is the basis for the most commonly used method of celestial navigation, and is referred to as the 'altitude-intercept method'. There are several other methods of celestial navigation which will also provide position finding using sextant observations, such as the noon sight, and the more archaic lunar distance method. Joshua Slocum used the lunar distance method during the first ever recorded single-handed circumnavigation of the world. Unlike the altitude-intercept method, the noon sight and lunar distance methods do not require accurate knowledge of time. The altitude-intercept method of celestial navigation requires that the observer know exact Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) at the moment of his observation of the celestial body, to the second—since every four seconds that the time source (commonly a chronometer or in aircraft, an accurate "hack watch") is in error, the position will be off by approximately one nautical mile...
https://wn.com/Determining_Position_By_Celestial_Navigation_1971_US_Navy_Training_Film_Graphic_Films_Cart
The Nautical mile

The Nautical mile

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:42
  • Updated: 01 Nov 2015
  • views: 7211
videos
Simple, easy to understand math videos aimed at High School students.
https://wn.com/The_Nautical_Mile
Sailing lesson - The Nautical Slide Rule

Sailing lesson - The Nautical Slide Rule

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:39
  • Updated: 16 Mar 2009
  • views: 16349
videos
This video shows how to use the nautical slide rule. Given two of the variables of speed and distance, the slide rule will calculate the other.
https://wn.com/Sailing_Lesson_The_Nautical_Slide_Rule
Great Circle Distance

Great Circle Distance

  • Order:
  • Duration: 13:37
  • Updated: 20 Apr 2013
  • views: 49611
videos
Calculate the distance between two cities.
https://wn.com/Great_Circle_Distance
Calculating Distance with Latitude

Calculating Distance with Latitude

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:01
  • Updated: 14 Oct 2015
  • views: 52099
videos
In this tutorial, Jennifer shows how you can use a location's latitude to determine how far north or south it is from another location. The same process can be used to calculate how far east or west a location is from another using longitude. One important reminder that is shown is how many minutes of latitude are in one degree of longitude.
https://wn.com/Calculating_Distance_With_Latitude
Navigation Basics - Reading a Nautical Chart - Kayaking Tips #48 - Kayak Hipster

Navigation Basics - Reading a Nautical Chart - Kayaking Tips #48 - Kayak Hipster

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:47
  • Updated: 16 Nov 2016
  • views: 6588
videos
Some basics of navigation, I go through the following topics on how to read a nautical chart: - Depths - Buoys, RRR - Hazards - Latitude and Longitude - Distances - Compass Rose - Magnetic vs True North Kayak Hipster http://www.kayakhipster.com
https://wn.com/Navigation_Basics_Reading_A_Nautical_Chart_Kayaking_Tips_48_Kayak_Hipster
Qgis Make circle by centre point and distance in degrees or nautical miles

Qgis Make circle by centre point and distance in degrees or nautical miles

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:29
  • Updated: 26 Jan 2017
  • views: 146
videos
make circle by centre point Latitude and Longitude and distance in degress and nautical miles
https://wn.com/Qgis_Make_Circle_By_Centre_Point_And_Distance_In_Degrees_Or_Nautical_Miles
Viewing Nautical Charts on Google Earth

Viewing Nautical Charts on Google Earth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:55
  • Updated: 15 Dec 2015
  • views: 40615
videos
A slick way to do echart navigation on google earth, as well as viewing all NOAA charts and even a fast way to download the RNC versions. NOTE: WE UPDATED THE LINK BELOW JAN 16, 2018 (thanks to PorcineJim ) Main link at NOAA describing the process https://nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/data/gis-data-and-services.html#seamless-raster-nautical-chart-services Direct link to the Google Earth file we need https://seamlessrnc.nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/rnc/noaa_rncs.kmz
https://wn.com/Viewing_Nautical_Charts_On_Google_Earth
Traditional Nautical Chart Navigation - Course P.S.C.

Traditional Nautical Chart Navigation - Course P.S.C.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:10
  • Updated: 26 Jan 2010
  • views: 158632
videos
Learn how to plot a course per standard compass on a paper nautical chart from the experts at U.S. Captains Training. Captain Neil Smith demonstrates finding points using the longitude and latitude scales, taking proper measurement on the compass rose with parallel rules, and converting degrees True to Compass. Practice along on a 1983 Block Island Sound chart to prepare for your upcoming U.S. Captains Training class and test.
https://wn.com/Traditional_Nautical_Chart_Navigation_Course_P.S.C.
E6B Flight Computer: Kilometers to Statue or Nautical Miles

E6B Flight Computer: Kilometers to Statue or Nautical Miles

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:43
  • Updated: 08 Dec 2010
  • views: 13397
videos
In this tutorial, I will demonstrate how to distance between Kilometers and Statute or Nautical miles using the Jeppesen E6B mechanical flight computer. If you find any mistakes, please point them out. Feel free to leave questions, comments, and feedback below. Good luck on your journey to becoming a pilot!
https://wn.com/E6B_Flight_Computer_Kilometers_To_Statue_Or_Nautical_Miles
Finding Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

Finding Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:10
  • Updated: 17 Sep 2017
  • views: 55
videos https://wn.com/Finding_Distance_(Nautical_Map_Navigation)
Marking Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

Marking Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:40
  • Updated: 17 Sep 2017
  • views: 34
videos https://wn.com/Marking_Distance_(Nautical_Map_Navigation)
Navigation - nautical distances (2of2)

Navigation - nautical distances (2of2)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:51
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2011
  • views: 258
videos
Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar
https://wn.com/Navigation_Nautical_Distances_(2Of2)
Distance SOLVED on GLEASON MAP • SCL to SYD • LAW OF COSINES • Flat Earth • Math & other fun stuff!

Distance SOLVED on GLEASON MAP • SCL to SYD • LAW OF COSINES • Flat Earth • Math & other fun stuff!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:12
  • Updated: 08 Apr 2017
  • views: 4057
videos
Flat Earth • 2017 • Chippy The Chipmunk had a "HOLY SH*T" moment when he realized straight line distances can be calculated between two places on Gleason's Flat Earth Map by using the Law of Cosines math. However, in this video, Chippy is making the assumption that each 15° of longitude = 900 Nautical Miles (as claimed by the globe folks). If Gleason is correct, then the circumference around the world is about 49,714 regular miles; which would mean that the diameter all the way across is 15,824 regular miles. This means that when you divide 15,824 miles by 24 (15° segments) = 659.33 regular miles, or 659.33/15 = 49.96 regular miles per 1° of longitude. In other words, we'd have to re-calculate using 659.33 miles per every 15° of longitude instead of using the globe's 900NM (1,035 miles per 15° of longitude). So, just something to keep in mind & this would of course make the distance from SCL to SYD much shorter if longitude is only 573 Nautical Miles (659.33 miles) per 15° of longitude. Thanks to John & Adam on Twitter for inspiring this video. Join us on Twitter: Chippy The Chipmunk: @ChipmonkChippy Adam Meakin: @larcheored John Savage: @swearyG LONGITUDE To DECIMAL point calculator: https://rechneronline.de/winkel/degrees-minutes-seconds.php LAW of COSINE calculator: http://www.calculatorsoup.com/calculators/geometry-plane/triangle-law-of-cosines.php Air Miles Distance calculator (SCL & SYD): http://www.airmilescalculator.com/distance/syd-to-scl/ See solving non-right triangles: http://www.sparknotes.com/testprep/books/sat2/math2c/chapter9section9.rhtml Thank you, Chippy ☺ Ps. let me know if I'm wrong... I'm not very good at math.
https://wn.com/Distance_Solved_On_Gleason_Map_•_Scl_To_Syd_•_Law_Of_Cosines_•_Flat_Earth_•_Math_Other_Fun_Stuff
5" Nautical shell Lidu distance test

5" Nautical shell Lidu distance test

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:29
  • Updated: 09 May 2015
  • views: 151
videos
5", water, shell, nautical, test, distance, fireworks, cool.
https://wn.com/5_Nautical_Shell_Lidu_Distance_Test
Chart Navigation (Chart Plotting Part 1)

Chart Navigation (Chart Plotting Part 1)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:36
  • Updated: 07 Nov 2014
  • views: 145092
videos
The steps for using a chart to fix your position, determine the dead reckoning, finding set and drift, course made good, and speed made good.
https://wn.com/Chart_Navigation_(Chart_Plotting_Part_1)
Nautical mile - Video Learning - WizScience.com

Nautical mile - Video Learning - WizScience.com

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:47
  • Updated: 10 Sep 2015
  • views: 3040
videos
A "nautical mile" is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly . It is a non-SI unit used especially by navigators at sea and in the air, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the "sea mile" and the related geographical mile. The nautical mile remains in use by sea and air navigators worldwide because of its convenience when working with charts. Most nautical charts use the Mercator projection whose scale varies by about a factor of six from the equator to 80° latitude, so charts covering large areas cannot use a single linear scale. The nautical mile is nearly equal to a minute of latitude on a chart, so a distance measured with a chart divider can be roughly converted to nautical miles using the chart's latitude scale. The "international nautical mile" was defined by the First International Extraordinary Hydrographic Conference, Monaco as exactly 1,852 metres. This is the only definition in widespread current use, and is the one accepted by the International Hydrographic Organization and by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures . Before 1929 different countries had different definitions, and the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and the United States did not immediately accept the international value. The Imperial and U.S. definitions of the nautical mile were based on the Clarke Spheroid: they were different approximations to the length of one minute of arc along a great circle of a sphere having the same surface area as the Clarke Spheroid. The United States nautical mile was defined as 1,853.248 metres : it was abandoned in favour of the international nautical mile in 1954. The Imperial nautical mile, also known as the "Admiralty mile", was defined in terms of the knot, such that one nautical mile was exactly 6,080 international feet : it was abandoned in 1970 and, for legal purposes, old references to the obsolete unit are now converted to 1,853 metres exactly. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautical+mile, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautical+mile, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
https://wn.com/Nautical_Mile_Video_Learning_Wizscience.Com
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