• Measuring miles on a nautical chart

    How to measure distance on a nautical chart.

    published: 26 Jan 2016
  • Measuring distance on a nautical chart

    How to measure distance on a chart and work out the time it will take to travel. Nautical navigation. Watersports training

    published: 27 May 2009
  • What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning & explanation

    What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning - NAUTICAL MILE definition -NAUTICAL MILE length - NAUTICAL MILE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance, set by international agreement as being exactly 1852 meters (about 6,076 feet), compared with the 5,280 feet in a statute mile. Historically, it was defined as the distance spanned by one minute of arc along a meridian of the Earth (north-south), and developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. Graphic scale from a Mercator projection world map, showing the change with latitude It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Unit...

    published: 09 Aug 2016
  • Navigation - nautical distances (1of2)

    Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar

    published: 02 Sep 2011
  • Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends

    Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends a central angle of 1 minute . This distance is called a nautical mile. (The radius of the earth is 3960 mi.)

    published: 04 Apr 2014
  • Lunar distance (navigation) - Video Learning - WizScience.com

    In celestial navigation, "lunar distance" is the angle between the Moon and another celestial body. The "lunar distances method" uses this angle, also called a "lunar", and a nautical almanac to calculate Greenwich time. By comparing that calculated time to the measured local time, the navigator can determine longitude. The method was used for some time during the 17th century, before the introduction of the marine chronometer. A similar method uses the positions of the Galilean moons of Jupiter. In celestial navigation, knowledge of the time at Greenwich and the measured positions of one or more celestial objects allows the navigator to calculate latitude and longitude. Reliable marine chronometers were unavailable until the late 18th century and not affordable until the 19th century....

    published: 29 Sep 2015
  • The Nautical mile - What is it?

    In this video we discuss the relationship between the size of the earth and the nautical mile. A nautical mile is equal to one minute of latitude, which is equivalent to one sixtieth of a degree of latitude. If we know the circumference of the earth, we can find the length of a nautical mile.

    published: 01 Nov 2015
  • Sea charts for coastal navigation

    This video is a basic introduction to sea charts. We will go through how to read depths and bridge heights, plot magnetic and true courses from the compass rose using a parallel ruler and how to measure distance in nautical miles. In particular detail is information on converting from magnetic to true and from true to magnetic. This is on of the fundamental skills required for coastal navigation.

    published: 08 Nov 2015
  • 11.653 kilometers, 7241 miles, 6292 nautical miles distance from Yoko.

    BPN - Diest. Belgium - Indonesia. Song : Adelaide Sky by Adhitia Sofyan

    published: 02 Sep 2017
  • Finding Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

    Yera 11 Math A Navigation Video

    published: 17 Sep 2017
  • Chart Navigation (Chart Plotting Part 1)

    The steps for using a chart to fix your position, determine the dead reckoning, finding set and drift, course made good, and speed made good.

    published: 07 Nov 2014
  • How Maritime Law Works

    Support Wendover Productions on Patreon: https://www.Patreon.com/WendoverProductions Maritime law is confusing, but interesting (I hope.) Last Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7PsmkAxVHdM Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/WendoverPro Email: WendoverProductions@gmail.com Attributions: South China Sea video courtesy youtube.com/militarytiger (Creative Commons License) Cruise Ship icon by Rohan Gupta from the Noun Project Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness Map by Alinor (Creative Commons License) Old Cruise Ship photo courtesy Roger W from Flickr (Creative Commons License) Foreign Coders photo courtesy Cory Doctorow from Flickr (Creative Commons License)

    published: 26 Jul 2016
  • Marking Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

    Navigation Course Math A

    published: 17 Sep 2017
  • Nautical Miles & Knots

    via YouTube Capture

    published: 04 Jul 2013
  • Nautical mile

    The nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly (about 6,076 feet). It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Units by the BIPM) used especially by navigators in the shipping and aviation industries, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

    published: 01 Aug 2014
  • E6B Flight Computer: Kilometers to Statue or Nautical Miles

    In this tutorial, I will demonstrate how to distance between Kilometers and Statute or Nautical miles using the Jeppesen E6B mechanical flight computer. If you find any mistakes, please point them out. Feel free to leave questions, comments, and feedback below. Good luck on your journey to becoming a pilot!

    published: 08 Dec 2010
  • Sailing lesson - The Nautical Slide Rule

    This video shows how to use the nautical slide rule. Given two of the variables of speed and distance, the slide rule will calculate the other.

    published: 16 Mar 2009
  • Navigation - nautical distances (2of2)

    Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar

    published: 02 Sep 2011
  • The Physics of Sailing - KQED QUEST

    Northern California has a storied, 500-year history of sailing. But despite this rich heritage, scientists and boat designers continue to learn more each day about what makes a sail boat move. Contrary to what you might expect, the physics of sailing still present some mysteries to modern sailors.

    published: 01 Oct 2008
  • 300 nautical miles part 1

    This flight is part of Canadian Commercial Pilot Training. You have to fligh a minimal distance of approx 300 nautical miles (approx. 600km) and land at 2 airports on your way. We where 2 pilots in this flight. One of us would fly one way and the other one the way back. So this is what it looks like being pilot, that's what we do... we fly.

    published: 04 Jun 2007
  • 5" Nautical shell Lidu distance test

    5", water, shell, nautical, test, distance, fireworks, cool.

    published: 09 May 2015
  • Navigation Basics - Reading a Nautical Chart - Kayaking Tips #48 - Kayak Hipster

    Some basics of navigation, I go through the following topics on how to read a nautical chart: - Depths - Buoys, RRR - Hazards - Latitude and Longitude - Distances - Compass Rose - Magnetic vs True North Kayak Hipster http://www.kayakhipster.com

    published: 16 Nov 2016
  • Nautical mile - Video Learning - WizScience.com

    A "nautical mile" is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly . It is a non-SI unit used especially by navigators at sea and in the air, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the "sea mile" and the related geographical mile. The nautical mile remains in use by sea and air navigators worldwide because of its convenience when working with charts. Most nautical charts use the Mercator projection whose scale varies by about a factor of six from the equator to 80° latitude, so charts covering large areas cannot use a single linear scale. The nautical ...

    published: 10 Sep 2015
  • 36 fix position bearing and vertical sextant angle bearing and vertical sextant angle 1

    A Fix can also be obtained by combining a compass bearing and a distance of the same lighthouse. You can determine the distance knowing the height and the vertical sextant angle of the lighthouse. Let's assume you sail near the coast and, looking on your nautical chart, you spot the lighthouse A. Among the characteristics of the lighthouse, you read that it has a charted height of 103 meters or 338 feet. This is the height above mean high water spring tide. After calculating the height of tide at that time, the corrected height of the lighthouse is 105 meters or 345 feet. Use the sextant and measure the vertical angle of the lighthouse. Let's assume, after applying the index error, that the vertical angle is 2 degrees and 30 minutes. Knowing the corrected height and the corrected v...

    published: 11 Apr 2014
developed with YouTube
Measuring miles on a nautical chart
2:35

Measuring miles on a nautical chart

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:35
  • Updated: 26 Jan 2016
  • views: 6542
videos
How to measure distance on a nautical chart.
https://wn.com/Measuring_Miles_On_A_Nautical_Chart
Measuring distance on a nautical chart
2:43

Measuring distance on a nautical chart

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:43
  • Updated: 27 May 2009
  • views: 18904
videos
How to measure distance on a chart and work out the time it will take to travel. Nautical navigation. Watersports training
https://wn.com/Measuring_Distance_On_A_Nautical_Chart
What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning & explanation
1:49

What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning & explanation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:49
  • Updated: 09 Aug 2016
  • views: 11861
videos
What is NAUTICAL MILE? What does NAUTICAL MILE mean? NAUTICAL MILE meaning - NAUTICAL MILE definition -NAUTICAL MILE length - NAUTICAL MILE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance, set by international agreement as being exactly 1852 meters (about 6,076 feet), compared with the 5,280 feet in a statute mile. Historically, it was defined as the distance spanned by one minute of arc along a meridian of the Earth (north-south), and developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. Graphic scale from a Mercator projection world map, showing the change with latitude It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Units by the BIPM), which is generally used by navigators at sea and in the air, and also in polar exploration. It remains in use worldwide because of its convenience when working with charts. Most nautical charts use the Mercator projection, whose scale varies by about a factor of 6 from the equator to 80° latitude, so charts covering large areas cannot use a single linear scale. The nautical mile is nearly equal to a minute of latitude on a chart, so a distance measured with a chart divider can be roughly converted to nautical miles using the chart's latitude scale. The nautical mile is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Nautical_Mile_What_Does_Nautical_Mile_Mean_Nautical_Mile_Meaning_Explanation
Navigation  - nautical distances (1of2)
8:44

Navigation - nautical distances (1of2)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:44
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2011
  • views: 514
videos
Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar
https://wn.com/Navigation_Nautical_Distances_(1Of2)
Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends
1:10

Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:10
  • Updated: 04 Apr 2014
  • views: 864
videos
Nautical Miles Find the distance along an arc on the surface of the earth that subtends a central angle of 1 minute . This distance is called a nautical mile. (The radius of the earth is 3960 mi.)
https://wn.com/Nautical_Miles_Find_The_Distance_Along_An_Arc_On_The_Surface_Of_The_Earth_That_Subtends
Lunar distance (navigation) - Video Learning - WizScience.com
2:48

Lunar distance (navigation) - Video Learning - WizScience.com

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:48
  • Updated: 29 Sep 2015
  • views: 1397
videos
In celestial navigation, "lunar distance" is the angle between the Moon and another celestial body. The "lunar distances method" uses this angle, also called a "lunar", and a nautical almanac to calculate Greenwich time. By comparing that calculated time to the measured local time, the navigator can determine longitude. The method was used for some time during the 17th century, before the introduction of the marine chronometer. A similar method uses the positions of the Galilean moons of Jupiter. In celestial navigation, knowledge of the time at Greenwich and the measured positions of one or more celestial objects allows the navigator to calculate latitude and longitude. Reliable marine chronometers were unavailable until the late 18th century and not affordable until the 19th century. After the method was first published in 1763 by British astronomer royal Nevil Maskelyne, for about a hundred years mariners lacking a chronometer used the method of lunar distances to determine Greenwich time as a key step in determining longitude. Conversely, a mariner with a chronometer could check its accuracy using a lunar determination of Greenwich time. The method relies on the relatively quick movement of the moon across the background sky, completing a circuit of 360 degrees in 27.3 days. In an hour then, it will move about half a degree, roughly its own diameter, with respect to the background stars and the Sun. Using a sextant, the navigator precisely measures the angle between the moon and another body. That could be the Sun or one of a selected group of bright stars lying close to the Moon's path, near the ecliptic; Regulus was particularly commonly used. At that moment, anyone on the surface of the earth who can see the same two bodies will observe the same angle . The navigator then consults a prepared table of lunar distances and the times at which they will occur. By comparing the corrected lunar distance with the tabulated values, the navigator finds the Greenwich time for that observation. Knowing Greenwich time and local time, the navigator can work out longitude. Local time can be determined from a sextant observation of the altitude of the Sun or a star. Then the longitude is readily calculated from the difference between local time and Greenwich Time, at 15 degrees per hour. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar+distance+(navigation), which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
https://wn.com/Lunar_Distance_(Navigation)_Video_Learning_Wizscience.Com
The Nautical mile - What is it?
3:42

The Nautical mile - What is it?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:42
  • Updated: 01 Nov 2015
  • views: 9298
videos
In this video we discuss the relationship between the size of the earth and the nautical mile. A nautical mile is equal to one minute of latitude, which is equivalent to one sixtieth of a degree of latitude. If we know the circumference of the earth, we can find the length of a nautical mile.
https://wn.com/The_Nautical_Mile_What_Is_It
Sea charts for coastal navigation
31:54

Sea charts for coastal navigation

  • Order:
  • Duration: 31:54
  • Updated: 08 Nov 2015
  • views: 17171
videos
This video is a basic introduction to sea charts. We will go through how to read depths and bridge heights, plot magnetic and true courses from the compass rose using a parallel ruler and how to measure distance in nautical miles. In particular detail is information on converting from magnetic to true and from true to magnetic. This is on of the fundamental skills required for coastal navigation.
https://wn.com/Sea_Charts_For_Coastal_Navigation
11.653 kilometers, 7241 miles, 6292 nautical miles distance from Yoko.
0:59

11.653 kilometers, 7241 miles, 6292 nautical miles distance from Yoko.

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:59
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2017
  • views: 19
videos https://wn.com/11.653_Kilometers,_7241_Miles,_6292_Nautical_Miles_Distance_From_Yoko.
Finding Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)
1:10

Finding Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:10
  • Updated: 17 Sep 2017
  • views: 70
videos https://wn.com/Finding_Distance_(Nautical_Map_Navigation)
Chart Navigation (Chart Plotting Part 1)
9:36

Chart Navigation (Chart Plotting Part 1)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:36
  • Updated: 07 Nov 2014
  • views: 162182
videos
The steps for using a chart to fix your position, determine the dead reckoning, finding set and drift, course made good, and speed made good.
https://wn.com/Chart_Navigation_(Chart_Plotting_Part_1)
How Maritime Law Works
6:27

How Maritime Law Works

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:27
  • Updated: 26 Jul 2016
  • views: 1870831
videos
Support Wendover Productions on Patreon: https://www.Patreon.com/WendoverProductions Maritime law is confusing, but interesting (I hope.) Last Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7PsmkAxVHdM Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/WendoverPro Email: WendoverProductions@gmail.com Attributions: South China Sea video courtesy youtube.com/militarytiger (Creative Commons License) Cruise Ship icon by Rohan Gupta from the Noun Project Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness Map by Alinor (Creative Commons License) Old Cruise Ship photo courtesy Roger W from Flickr (Creative Commons License) Foreign Coders photo courtesy Cory Doctorow from Flickr (Creative Commons License)
https://wn.com/How_Maritime_Law_Works
Marking Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)
1:40

Marking Distance (Nautical Map Navigation)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:40
  • Updated: 17 Sep 2017
  • views: 41
videos https://wn.com/Marking_Distance_(Nautical_Map_Navigation)
Nautical Miles & Knots
3:53

Nautical Miles & Knots

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:53
  • Updated: 04 Jul 2013
  • views: 19066
videos
via YouTube Capture
https://wn.com/Nautical_Miles_Knots
Nautical mile
10:57

Nautical mile

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:57
  • Updated: 01 Aug 2014
  • views: 8960
videos
The nautical mile (symbol M, NM or nmi) is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly (about 6,076 feet). It is a non-SI unit (although accepted for use in the International System of Units by the BIPM) used especially by navigators in the shipping and aviation industries, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the sea mile and the related geographical mile. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
https://wn.com/Nautical_Mile
E6B Flight Computer: Kilometers to Statue or Nautical Miles
1:43

E6B Flight Computer: Kilometers to Statue or Nautical Miles

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:43
  • Updated: 08 Dec 2010
  • views: 13997
videos
In this tutorial, I will demonstrate how to distance between Kilometers and Statute or Nautical miles using the Jeppesen E6B mechanical flight computer. If you find any mistakes, please point them out. Feel free to leave questions, comments, and feedback below. Good luck on your journey to becoming a pilot!
https://wn.com/E6B_Flight_Computer_Kilometers_To_Statue_Or_Nautical_Miles
Sailing lesson - The Nautical Slide Rule
0:39

Sailing lesson - The Nautical Slide Rule

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:39
  • Updated: 16 Mar 2009
  • views: 16670
videos
This video shows how to use the nautical slide rule. Given two of the variables of speed and distance, the slide rule will calculate the other.
https://wn.com/Sailing_Lesson_The_Nautical_Slide_Rule
Navigation - nautical distances (2of2)
2:51

Navigation - nautical distances (2of2)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:51
  • Updated: 02 Sep 2011
  • views: 261
videos
Answer to Navigation question 10 - Use dividers to on the Timor Sea chart below to find the distance in nautical miles between : a) the peak on Moa and the northern lighthouse on Wetar b) the lighthouses on Kisar and Lakor c) Recon light and the peak on Babar
https://wn.com/Navigation_Nautical_Distances_(2Of2)
The Physics of Sailing - KQED QUEST
9:32

The Physics of Sailing - KQED QUEST

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:32
  • Updated: 01 Oct 2008
  • views: 1543569
videos
Northern California has a storied, 500-year history of sailing. But despite this rich heritage, scientists and boat designers continue to learn more each day about what makes a sail boat move. Contrary to what you might expect, the physics of sailing still present some mysteries to modern sailors.
https://wn.com/The_Physics_Of_Sailing_Kqed_Quest
300 nautical miles part 1
7:54

300 nautical miles part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:54
  • Updated: 04 Jun 2007
  • views: 427
videos
This flight is part of Canadian Commercial Pilot Training. You have to fligh a minimal distance of approx 300 nautical miles (approx. 600km) and land at 2 airports on your way. We where 2 pilots in this flight. One of us would fly one way and the other one the way back. So this is what it looks like being pilot, that's what we do... we fly.
https://wn.com/300_Nautical_Miles_Part_1
5" Nautical shell Lidu distance test
0:29

5" Nautical shell Lidu distance test

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:29
  • Updated: 09 May 2015
  • views: 156
videos
5", water, shell, nautical, test, distance, fireworks, cool.
https://wn.com/5_Nautical_Shell_Lidu_Distance_Test
Navigation Basics - Reading a Nautical Chart - Kayaking Tips #48 - Kayak Hipster
6:47

Navigation Basics - Reading a Nautical Chart - Kayaking Tips #48 - Kayak Hipster

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:47
  • Updated: 16 Nov 2016
  • views: 7369
videos
Some basics of navigation, I go through the following topics on how to read a nautical chart: - Depths - Buoys, RRR - Hazards - Latitude and Longitude - Distances - Compass Rose - Magnetic vs True North Kayak Hipster http://www.kayakhipster.com
https://wn.com/Navigation_Basics_Reading_A_Nautical_Chart_Kayaking_Tips_48_Kayak_Hipster
Nautical mile - Video Learning - WizScience.com
2:47

Nautical mile - Video Learning - WizScience.com

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:47
  • Updated: 10 Sep 2015
  • views: 3488
videos
A "nautical mile" is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian. By international agreement it has been set at 1,852 metres exactly . It is a non-SI unit used especially by navigators at sea and in the air, and also in polar exploration. It is commonly used in international law and treaties, especially regarding the limits of territorial waters. It developed from the "sea mile" and the related geographical mile. The nautical mile remains in use by sea and air navigators worldwide because of its convenience when working with charts. Most nautical charts use the Mercator projection whose scale varies by about a factor of six from the equator to 80° latitude, so charts covering large areas cannot use a single linear scale. The nautical mile is nearly equal to a minute of latitude on a chart, so a distance measured with a chart divider can be roughly converted to nautical miles using the chart's latitude scale. The "international nautical mile" was defined by the First International Extraordinary Hydrographic Conference, Monaco as exactly 1,852 metres. This is the only definition in widespread current use, and is the one accepted by the International Hydrographic Organization and by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures . Before 1929 different countries had different definitions, and the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and the United States did not immediately accept the international value. The Imperial and U.S. definitions of the nautical mile were based on the Clarke Spheroid: they were different approximations to the length of one minute of arc along a great circle of a sphere having the same surface area as the Clarke Spheroid. The United States nautical mile was defined as 1,853.248 metres : it was abandoned in favour of the international nautical mile in 1954. The Imperial nautical mile, also known as the "Admiralty mile", was defined in terms of the knot, such that one nautical mile was exactly 6,080 international feet : it was abandoned in 1970 and, for legal purposes, old references to the obsolete unit are now converted to 1,853 metres exactly. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautical+mile, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautical+mile, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
https://wn.com/Nautical_Mile_Video_Learning_Wizscience.Com
36    fix position bearing and vertical sextant angle bearing and vertical sextant angle 1
1:43

36 fix position bearing and vertical sextant angle bearing and vertical sextant angle 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:43
  • Updated: 11 Apr 2014
  • views: 20482
videos
A Fix can also be obtained by combining a compass bearing and a distance of the same lighthouse. You can determine the distance knowing the height and the vertical sextant angle of the lighthouse. Let's assume you sail near the coast and, looking on your nautical chart, you spot the lighthouse A. Among the characteristics of the lighthouse, you read that it has a charted height of 103 meters or 338 feet. This is the height above mean high water spring tide. After calculating the height of tide at that time, the corrected height of the lighthouse is 105 meters or 345 feet. Use the sextant and measure the vertical angle of the lighthouse. Let's assume, after applying the index error, that the vertical angle is 2 degrees and 30 minutes. Knowing the corrected height and the corrected vertical sextant angle of the lighthouse, calculate the distance, using the formula: D is equal to h times 0.565, divided by v, where D is the Distance in nautical miles, h is the Height of the Lighthouse in feet, and v is the Vertical sextant angle in minutes. In our case, 345 feet times 0.565 divided by 150 equals 1.3 nautical miles.
https://wn.com/36_Fix_Position_Bearing_And_Vertical_Sextant_Angle_Bearing_And_Vertical_Sextant_Angle_1
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